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  • Hiigaran - Language and Culture

    Has anybody here read this gem of a piece by DerKommissar on the Relic Forums?

    The Hiigaran - Language and Culture thread was started back in 2003; unfortunately DK never continued with their work.

    So this is an appeal if DerKommissar can once again start this awesome thread perhaps here at the BBI forums, or anybody who knows them could contact them for me? I would love to collaborate, if any assistance is required.

    Arkoshal Cora!
    Greetings Relic Forums Dwellers! Hi! Before continuing to read my post, please follow this link and brief yourselves on what I've already said. Note: It's the Eighth Post in this thread Alright, now you've figured out what I'm all about. This thread is called "Hiigaran" because it is to be dedicated to the Hiigaran language. I myself have been working on this project for some time and I will not need a lot of assistance. However, I will be posting information about the language as
    Last edited by Tuulof_Nabaal; 28-01-2016, 08:18 PM.
    ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

  • #2
    I don't know them, but I do know of another "World-class expert of anything Hiigaran" in Arinn Dembo: http://arinndembo.com/

    She was one of the two original writers who worked under the pen name of "Marcus Skyler" for the original 1999 Homeworld.

    The other half of "Marcus Skyler" is Martin Cirullis, who wrote the Expedition Guide for Deserts of Kharak as a freelancer called in by BBI.
    (and which Expedition Guide Arinn proofread for him since Martin is her CEO at Kerberos Productions( kerberos-productions.com/ ) and she's by his own words the foremost expert of anything Hiigaran culture. Another fun fact is that their studios, Kerberos, is actually made out of a lot of the team who originally developed HW:Cataclysm as "Barking" Dog Studios" in the days. They formed Kerberos as they wanted to make space games again rather than the "highschool simulators" they had to make when Barking Dog became Rockstar Vancouver if I recall well. This led to the Sword of the Stars series, and recently they released a new IP in Kaiju-a-Gogo which might as well be "XCOM as the invader side, using giant movie monsters").


    She also happen to be the woman who came up with the hiigaran word "Kiith" in the first place: http://arinndembo.com/homeworld-remastered/
    She's pretty accessible on both the Kerberos forums, Twitter and her blog.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by LMercier View Post
      I don't know them, but I do know of another "World-class expert of anything Hiigaran" in Arinn Dembo: http://arinndembo.com/
      Thanks LMercier this helps; I'll attempt to contact her and see if she can guide me, if possible.

      I'm intending to take up where DerKommissar left, of course with the proper due credits to their work.

      Arkoshal Cora!
      Last edited by Tuulof_Nabaal; 29-01-2016, 12:43 AM.
      ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

      Comment


      • #4
        To KHARAK,
        with all our love

        Acknowledgements

        As all fan-fiction need a bedrock for support, without the foundation of the Homeworld franchise, this undertaking would have not been possible. And since we're no exception. We want to take this moment to acknowledge the great creation that is the Homeworld Universe; and attribute it to Relic Entertainment (the original creators), along with all the writers and consultants/freelancers responsible for fleshing out the stories we love so much, and thank Gearbox Software and Blackbird Interactive (current owners of the IP) for keeping the series alive with fresh tales. Thank you ...

        BEGINNING KUSHAN-LA
        Even you can learn to speak Kushan-La



        Preface


        With these lessons, you can brush up your knowledge of Kushan-La, or develop new skills with the language. It’s not enough to be able to read and write Kushan-La, the fun comes in speaking it. So concentrate on the rules for pronunciation in the introduction next, practice making the Kushan-La sounds, say them out loud over and over. Then you’ll be better able to ask questions and use the conversational phrases in the forthcoming lessons.

        Unlike a history lesson or a novel which you can read and hope to remember, using a language lesson requires memorizing, practice exercises and review. We suggest you to digest one lesson at a time, memorize at least five kushan-la words with their meanings at each session. Review the words you memorize, so that your growing vocabulary will stick with you.

        The basic fundamentals of grammar structure will be clearly and simply explained, the various parts of speech will be shown in examples as they are used in Kushan-La. There is a separate “dictionary” post that will give you a start on building a vocabulary of Kushan-La words. Scattered throughout the lessons will be additional collections of useful words.

        We hope this simplified course will give you a working knowledge of this beautiful yet mystical language.

        Original Concept and Work by DerKommissar
        New Edition - collected and further expanded by Tuulof Nabaal & collaborators


        Contents
        Last edited by Tuulof_Nabaal; 02-02-2016, 09:01 AM.
        ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

        Comment


        • #5
          In learning Kushan-La all by yourself, it's important to realize at the very beginning that Kushan-La may seem like a language of strange signs and symbols, so these transliteration language lessons depict the Kushan-La alphabet in English.

          The transliterated alphabet


          Kushan-La words are made up of syllables, a syllable is one or more letters that are pronounced together. Syllables are composed of letters – vowels and consonants, there are twenty-five letters in the Kushan-La transliterated alphabet:

          a, b, c, d, e , f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q, r, s, t, u, v, w, y, z… These letters are the same as in English except for the x which is used in foreign words.

          There are six vowels in Kushan-La; a, e, i, o, u, y and the nineteen consonants are b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n , p, q, r, s, t ,v, w, z.

          The signs


          The apostrophe (') is used to show the connection between two or more words, or parts of a word. Most commonly seen in proper nouns.

          The hyphen (-) is used to indicate the plural or an adjective form of a word.

          The stress


          In Kushan-La all of the syllables of a word are of equal importance and should get equal stress, in English we have a tendency to slip over syllables that aren't strongly accented. Some syllables are, thus, lost. Say out loud, for instance, the word animal. The stress goes on the first syllable an, you slide over the i, and accent lightly the mal. In Kushan-La the same word would have been stressed in three equal syllables, a ni mal. If anything, the last syllable gets a bit more stress.

          The pronunciation


          In the absence of a teacher to show you how to mouth the sounds of Kushan-La letters and combination of letters, we feel that it is easiest and most practical to give you their closest equivalent sounds in English. In each case the English equivalent is like the Kushan-La sound. It's not exact, but close!

          In the following explanation of Kushan-La pronunciation, read it out loud. You must make the sounds – not just read them. In our next post we'll provide sample Kushan-La words for practice, say them over and over again, sharp and clear, so that you remember the sound when you see written words, and when you hear words spoken.

          The vowels

          a ----- a (hat)
          e ----- eh (bet)
          i ----- ih (fish)
          o ----- ah (lot) or oh (float) depending on usage
          u ----- uh (cut)
          y ----- je (yet)

          The combined vowels

          aa ----- aa (as in "at" but with a longer a "aat")
          ee ----- ee (fee)
          ii ----- iih (there is no good English equivalent here so you have to use your imagination. Try thinking of the emphasis you place on the e in "he")
          uu ----- uu (hook) or oo (fluke) depending on usage
          yy ----- eeee (no english equivalent, think fleeeece)
          ay ----- aye (icon)

          The consonants

          Most of the Kushan-La consonants are pronounced as they are in English…

          b ----- b (orb)
          c ----- c (cat)
          d ----- d (cod)
          f ----- f (elf)
          g ----- g (leg)
          h ----- h (hot)
          k ----- k (cat)
          l ----- l (let)
          m ----- m (elm)
          n ----- n (net)
          p ----- p (tap - this letter is pronounced with breath, like in English, not like French)
          qu ----- kw
          r ----- r (rest)
          s ----- s (sap)
          t ----- t (tap)
          v ----- v (vacuum)
          w ----- w (word)
          z ----- z (zeta)

          Kushan-La sound-alikes

          nm ----- nm (an interesting combination, think of the country "Namibia")
          sh ----- sh (ship)
          ch ----- ch (charge)
          th ----- th (myth)
          Last edited by Tuulof_Nabaal; 31-01-2016, 09:35 PM.
          ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

          Comment


          • #6
            I had a thought the other day regarding Kiithid culture, I wonder if Arinn gave it some thought? When a Kiith member gets married, how is he/she supposed to keep track of their lineage if they are marrying within the Kiith and everyone has the last surname?

            It makes me wonder if in a culture like this, "Tamiir, son of Laadar, son of Jared, son of Marcus Maanan of the northern sea" is very common to identify one's family lines. That, or Kiithid naturally are hyper-aware of their parantage as a consequence of this kind of surname arrangement. It would be interesting to see how the time of "transferring power to the individual" affected this, since if a Kiithid is less family-inclined and does not maintain their records, what would happen when they met someone and didn't know how they were related while having the same last name?

            Comment


            • #7
              Hey Norsehound the little that I've been exposed to Arab culture, includes their naming system. And since Kushan/Hiigaran society has quite a bit of Middle Eastern influence, it would make sense that their naming schema would draw parallels.

              I'm yet to get Arinn's attention here, but I'm hoping she might drop-in sometime and share some more lore!
              ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

              Comment


              • #8
                Vocabulary




                (words confirmed as canon based on the technical manuals, briefings and guides from HW1, HW: Cataclysm, HW2 and HW: DoK)

                Daiamid - ruling council
                Khar-Toba - first settlement
                kiith - a clan, family unit
                kiith-sa - head of a kiith
                raachok - hurled dart
                Kudaark-a large burrowing animal
                Sajuuk Cor - Wrath of Sajuuk or "Sajuuk's Wrath"
                Skaal-tel and Skaal-fa - male and female of a dangerous Kharakid predator
                Clee-San - truth seeker
                Fal-Corum - silent wayfarer
                Kuun-Lan - purifying flame
                Pauura - vengeance
                Siifar Kor'shesh - night of fiery daggers
                Gritiidim - sand people
                Hiigara - home
                diirvaas - sword dancing
                seejur - spiked hand worn combat shield

                (conjectural words)1

                glofka - friend
                iguulka - enemy
                bezakpart - alien
                laawa - space
                vard - room
                sochid - story
                juuk - book
                pod'jar - building
                forj - meal
                gehul'forj - lunch
                lak'forj - dinner
                moyip'forj - breakfast
                lamon - star
                oshek - sun
                laamat - light
                toba - settlement
                oru - city
                koya - child
                woral - spouse
                okon - year
                pay - day
                siifar - night
                Ak - I (the first-person personal pronoun)
                Haak - You (the second-person personal pronoun)
                Oks - He (the male third-person personal pronoun)
                Oksfa - She (the female third-person personal pronoun)
                Ko - It (the third-person object personal pronoun)
                Yem - We (the first-person plural personal pronoun)
                Hiyus - You (the second-person plural personal pronoun)
                Oks-da - They (the third-person plural personal pronoun)
                Yor - to (the preposition)
                1. I verily welcome collaborators; you may send suggestions for new Kushan-La words by PM to me
                Last edited by Tuulof_Nabaal; 02-02-2016, 11:02 AM.
                ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

                Comment


                • #9
                  The Articles



                  Articles precede the subject or object with an apostrophe that connects the two words together.1

                  Indefinite Article

                  Ark'sochid, a story
                  Ark'glofka, a friend

                  Definite Article

                  Lon'oru - the city
                  Lon'rozt - the vessel
                  Lon'juuk-da - the books
                  Lon'siifar-da - the nights
                  1. Additional examples will be added along with exercises at the end of each lesson at a future date
                  Last edited by Tuulof_Nabaal; 02-02-2016, 07:56 AM.
                  ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Verb: Present tense of regular verbs


                    The conjugation of simple regular verbs occurs as follows;

                    Yor'horma - to walk

                    Ak horma - I walk, I do walk
                    Haak hormaee - You walk, you do walk
                    Oks hormaay - He walks, he does walk
                    Oksfa hormaay - She walks, she does walk
                    Yem hormaam - We walk, we do walk
                    Hiyus hormayu - You walk, you do walk
                    Oks-da hormamak- They walk, they do walk

                    Another example;

                    Yor'kaav - to hate

                    Ak kaav - I hate, I do hate
                    Haak kaavee - You hate, you do hate
                    Oks kaavay - He hates, he does hates
                    Oksfa kaavay - She hates, she does hates
                    Yem kaavam - We hate, we do hate
                    Hiyus kaavyu - You hate, you do hate
                    Oks-da kaavmak - They hate, they do hate

                    Some common regular verbs

                    Deem - think
                    Kraat - say
                    Ros - do
                    Noil - love, like
                    Viin - see
                    Shaan - thank
                    San - seek
                    Viir - shine, shimmer
                    Kaan - fly
                    Scriiv - write
                    Katat - read
                    Baab - hear
                    Vaas - dancing
                    Ferin - celebrate
                    Last edited by Tuulof_Nabaal; 03-02-2016, 03:00 AM.
                    ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Norsehound View Post
                      I had a thought the other day regarding Kiithid culture, I wonder if Arinn gave it some thought? When a Kiith member gets married, how is he/she supposed to keep track of their lineage if they are marrying within the Kiith and everyone has the last surname?

                      It makes me wonder if in a culture like this, "Tamiir, son of Laadar, son of Jared, son of Marcus Maanan of the northern sea" is very common to identify one's family lines. That, or Kiithid naturally are hyper-aware of their parantage as a consequence of this kind of surname arrangement. It would be interesting to see how the time of "transferring power to the individual" affected this, since if a Kiithid is less family-inclined and does not maintain their records, what would happen when they met someone and didn't know how they were related while having the same last name?

                      You could always asks Arinn herself

                      She's pretty much very active on both her blog ( http://arinndembo.com/ ), Twitter ( https://twitter.com/Erinys?lang=en ) . She's very talkative, and generally always glad to chat with fans for what I can tell.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Norsehound View Post
                        I had a thought the other day regarding Kiithid culture, I wonder if Arinn gave it some thought? When a Kiith member gets married, how is he/she supposed to keep track of their lineage if they are marrying within the Kiith and everyone has the last surname?

                        It makes me wonder if in a culture like this, "Tamiir, son of Laadar, son of Jared, son of Marcus Maanan of the northern sea" is very common to identify one's family lines. That, or Kiithid naturally are hyper-aware of their parantage as a consequence of this kind of surname arrangement. It would be interesting to see how the time of "transferring power to the individual" affected this, since if a Kiithid is less family-inclined and does not maintain their records, what would happen when they met someone and didn't know how they were related while having the same last name?
                        It's an interesting quandry. Early in Kushan history when the population was low and you mostly interacted with people in your village/town/tribe it probably wasn't a big deal and things would be easy to track. Just make sure to indicate where your family was from and your good. The problems only really take off when the population starts to expand and get bigger and more centralized. But I'll bet modern Kushaan society solves the problem with digital records to keep track of genealogy and genetic scanning.

                        Things do get a bit when you consider the fact that the Kushan could change families and take on a new surname. Hell, entire Vassal Families can do so but as long as someone remembers to write down or record any changing of Kiiths it's not too difficult.

                        Fun fact about Surnames.... In the U.S. just 1,752 surnames account for about 50% of all of the surnames in the country. 1% being 'Smith', a whopping 3.189 million people.
                        It gets even more insane in China where an estimated 85% of China's population share the same 100 surnames.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Languages of Kharak





                          Kushan-La is considered as the de facto lingua franca for all Kushan. It was derived from the native tongues of the major kiithid that established the Daiamid; this way any Kushan with the basic knowledge of the constituent languages could comprehend and communicate in Kushan-La.

                          By the time of the discovery of Khar-Toba, besides the Gaalsien, all kiithid of the epoch maintained records and interacted in Kushan-La. Though it was not uncommon for linguistic variations to exist as dialects; for example Manaani the trade pidgin of the Manaan, Jakuul-Ka spoken by the priests of the Somtaaw Temples, Kraat-Paktu the native tongue of the people of the south, Sjetti still used by some old-school Sjet scientists and researchers and Mari'Nabaal-La of the Nabaal.

                          Historically, only three prime languages had existed before the Heresy Wars commenced, Gaalsi, Siid and Sjetti. As vassals broke off from their Gaalsien and Siidim rulers, many of these future kiith evolved their dialects to uniquely adapt to their new way of life.
                          Last edited by Tuulof_Nabaal; 04-02-2016, 04:43 AM.
                          ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Numbers



                            Here are the cardinal numbers from 1 - 20;

                            1 ----- Kar
                            2 ----- Var
                            3 ----- See
                            4 ----- Vavar
                            5 ----- Gaf
                            6 ----- Seevar
                            7 ----- Maala
                            8 ----- Amaala
                            9 ----- Aylsaa
                            10 -----Vargaf
                            11 ----- Karta
                            12 ----- Varta
                            13 ----- Seeta
                            14 ----- Vavarta
                            15 ----- Gafta
                            16 ----- Vargaf ul seevar
                            17 ----- Vargaf ul maala
                            18 ----- Vargaf ul amaala
                            19 ----- Vargaf ul Aylsaa
                            20 ----- Lilita

                            Ordinal numbers are formed by adding ra to the cardinal word and since they're adjectives hyphens are used as separators. So the first ordinal numbers from 1 - 20 are as follows;

                            1st ----- Kar-ra
                            2nd ----- Var-ra
                            3rd ----- See-ra
                            4th ----- Vavar-ra
                            5th ----- Gaf-ra
                            6th ----- Seevar-ra
                            7th ----- Maala-ra
                            8th ----- Amaala-ra
                            9th ----- Aylsaa-ra
                            10th -----Vargaf-ra
                            11th ----- Karta-ra
                            12th ----- Varta-ra
                            13th ----- Seeta-ra
                            14th ----- Vavarta-ra
                            15th ----- Gafta-ra
                            16th ----- Vargaf ul seevar-ra
                            17th ----- Vargaf ul maala-ra
                            18th ----- Vargaf ul amaala-ra
                            19th ----- Vargaf ul Aylsaa-ra
                            20th ----- Lilita-ra
                            ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The Plural of Nouns


                              In general, the plural of a noun is formed by adding da to the singular and separating the two with the hyphen. Consider the following examples;

                              Stuur - Chair
                              Stuur-da - Chairs

                              However exceptions do exist, for certain words. The most well-known is;

                              Kiith - clan, family
                              Kiithid - clans, families
                              ... mor, ak faar grache rot kushan-la!

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